Reviews of Gumbo Justice Author Holli, Castillo,

August 1, 2009 at 8:20 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )


 gumbo justice

Synopsis of Gumbo Justice

New Orleans can be a dangerous place. Especially for a prosecutor.

Ryan Murphy is an assistant district attorney who likes her Tequila cold and her cops hot. With a mouth that doesn’t know quite when to stop, her attitude plays well in front of a jury, but has a tendency to tick off judges, defendants, and other attorneys alike. Battling demons from her past and checking her self-destructive streak take a back seat to her ambition, and she’s not above skating the line just a little to get what she wants. It seems her hard work is just about to pay off. If she snags a detective in the process, well, that’s just a little lagniappe for her trouble. Life should be good.

Enter a demented psycho, with a plan to ruin Ryan’s life before he ultimately kills her.

Set against the backdrop of pre-Katrina New Orleans, Gumbo Justice is the first in a series that follows the tumultuous life of prosecutor Ryan Murphy.

REVIEWS:

A New Queen of Thrillers,

By J. M. Orenduff, author of THE POT THIEF 

 

“Move over James Patterson – Holli Castillo has arrived. Well, it makes sense doesn’t it? Patterson was an advertising exec; Holli Castillo is a criminal appellate public defender and former prosecutor in New Orleans. Which one do you suppose has been up close and personal with the seamy side of life? Castillo’s first thriller – Gumbo Justice – takes us on a wild ride into the drug scene in the Big Easy’s projects where we’re confronted with intertwined mysteries. Who is killing the defendants that assistant prosecutor Ryan Murphy failed to convict? And how is Murphy’s mysterious family history related to the killings? The plot takes more twists and turns than the old Zephyr roller coaster at Pontchartrain Beach. The final curve will blow you away, so whatever you do, do not peek at the last page. Murphy is the best hard-boiled heroine since V. I. Warshawski, but she’s smarter, tougher, and – in a piece of brilliant character development – paradoxically more vulnerable. Gumbo Justice is fast-paced and tightly woven, combining a psycho-thriller, a police procedural in a city where procedure takes a back seat to impulse, and a terrific love story – a stunning achievement.”

By Sunny Frazier, author of WHERE ANGELS FEAR and others in the Christy Bristol Mystery series“Holli Castillo has the pulse on law enforcement beyond the headlines in pre-Katrina New Orleans. Her background as a public defender lends her debut novel authenticity and a strong voice to prosecutor Ryan Murphy. Part police procedural, part legal drama, Castillo is a welcome addition to both genres.”

LINKS

website www.gumbojustice.net     www.hollicastillo.com

blog www.gumbojustice.blogspot.com

 

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The Pot Thief by Michael Orenduff

July 29, 2009 at 8:57 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , )


 

 

 

The Pot Thief Who Studied Pythagoras

 

Synopsis

 

           

The Pot ThiefThe Pot Thief Who Studied Pythagoras

 

Synopsis

 

            When a shady character offers him $25,000 to steal a thousand-year-old pot from the Valle del Rio Museum, Hubert Schuze knows he should turn it down. His pot digging may be illegal, but it s a big step from that to robbery. But he figures it can t hurt just to visit the museum and assay his chances. He figured wrong. After deciding the museum is impregnable, he returns to his shop to find a BLM agent who accuses him of stealing the rare pot. Theft charges escalate to murder, and Hubert must solve the crime to clear himself. His powerful deductive skills and weak nerves are put to the test as he creates a hoax to get the pot out of the museum and solves both the first murder and a second one whose victim turns out to be the person Schuze thought was murdered to begin

 

Reviews

 

The Pot Thief Who Studied Pythagoras has all the components of a great read – an intricate plot, quirky characters, crackling dialog, and a surprise ending.  What’s more, Orenduff successfully captures the essence of New Mexico through humor, romance, and even a little philosophical musing.  New Mexico ’s rich history, people, food, and landscape come alive on its pages.  But, while Orenduff’s account is authentic, this book leaves you wanting more of New Mexico , and the only way to remedy that is to come see for yourself. 

– Bill Richardson, Governor of New Mexico

 

The Pot Thief Who Studied Pythagoras proves that the measure of a successful detective story often depends upon the person of the protagonist.  Orenduff’s Hubert Schuze (affectionately, and appropriately, known as Hubie) is a fantastic creation — by turns modest and bold, sensitive, a wee bit finicky, intensely curious, and loyal.  Schuze is the type of character that you regret doesn’t exist in real life, as is his wonderful sidekick and best friend, Susannah.  Orenduff has obviously spent lots of time in and has great affection for the Northern New Mexico area, because he manages to successfully capture its flavor.  As in the case of Robert B. Parker’s Boston and Sue Grafton’s California coast, you can’t really imagine “The Pot Thief” happening anywhere else.  (By the way, if you are into Mexican/New Mexican food, do not read this book on an empty stomach – I got sidetracked by all the tantalizing descriptions!)  Because of Schuze’s personality and outlook, his entanglement in a web of intrigue, theft, and murder is all the more entertaining.  Schuze is the type of guy who finds himself in deep water purely (well, mostly) by accident, and his reactions to one unexpected situation after another really drive the spirit of the book.  While the plot is very tightly constructed (and impossible to predict), Orenduff’s characters and their very real humanity are what really made me love this book.

– Claire Bartos in Amazon.com

 

Folks, this is an outstanding book! I bought it at the PSWA conference mainly because I thought Michael was a charming guy and I liked the cover of the book. I had no idea what it was about. Oh, of course Billie told me it was a good book, but after all, she is the publisher of the Pot Thief.  What a surprise I was in for when I began reading. This is a mystery, but not like any mystery I’ve ever read before. The hero, Hubert, sells old pots from his shop in New Mexico, he also digs pots up which is no longer legal, and he can make a pot that looks like the old ones. Hubert gets all tangled up in a most devious plot to steal a pot from a museum, but the book is so much more than that. I laughed out loud in several spots, the dialogue is wonderful. Orenduff knows how to spin an intelligent tale and turn a surprising phrase.
Next, I’d like him to write a cookbook. I’ve never read about such mouth watering food before. If you want an entertaining time, do pick up the Pot Thief Who Studied Pythagoras. Thanks, Mike, for several hours of great fun.

Marilyn a.k.a. F. M. Meredith
Author of No Sanctuary

 

 

J orenduffLinks:

www.orenduff.org

www.ThePotThief.blogspot.com

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