Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option A true story of success

February 24, 2011 at 7:22 pm (family) (, , , , , , , , , )


Advertisements

Permalink Leave a Comment

Dream Catcher Failure Was Never An Option

November 2, 2010 at 10:02 pm (Books by Yvonne Mason) (, , , , , , , )


Permalink 3 Comments

Latest Review for Dream Catcher Failure Was Never An Option

September 6, 2010 at 2:52 pm (Books by Yvonne Mason) (, , , , , , , )


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Failure Was Never An Option, July 15, 2010
By W. Day “wandlday_2@yahoo.com” (Fairfax, SC USA) – See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option (na) (Kindle Edition)
This heartfelt book follows the life history of a very special little boy and a very special family. This true story started in an era when public help was nonexistent, and persons with disabilities were not accepted. The work of the family and very supportive neighbors turn what could have been a sad story into a success story. Emotions and family love are expressed throughout this book, as many hurdles were flattened so that one life could touch so many others. This story will touch your life as you share the events that unfolded through the years. Failure was not an option and not accepted. Here we learn the value of setting a goal and aiming for that goal in spite of what others think. Caution: humor included- read sitting down.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Review By Cynthia Parker for Dream Catcher Failure Was Never An Option by Yvonne Mason

February 17, 2010 at 6:14 pm (Books by Yvonne Mason) (, , , , , , , , , )


Dream Catcher Failure Was Never An Option

Dear Yvonne,

I want to let you know how much I enjoyed Dream Catcher. Stan’s story is so important, a story for our time, in helping us to see how essential it is that each child is accepted, included, and embraced in society and what they have to offer. Stan was fortunate that he had family and friends who fought for this and who believed in him. Thank you for writing this book, for sharing the gift of your family’s experience — the gift of Stan’s story. It is so perfectly titled.

Back in the eighties, I volunteered at a church for what was called Saturday School for adults with Down’s syndrome and autism and other cognitive challenges. Class was usually followed by a church service that these beautiful people themselves led and conducted. I thought they were pretty amazing. They understood alot more than what we often gave them credit for. I sometimes wondered what they were doing in a class all by themselves and had alot of mixed feelings about it. It seemed that the class was more for the “benefit” of others who didn’t want these people mainstreamed, aside from the “once a year” services when they were actually included. I remember thinking that this is how it should be every Sunday.

I used to be in total amazement of a little girl at one of the schools I used to substitute teach in. She was about seven and blind and was allowed to be in a regular classroom. Do you know that little girl could type word for word a whole story that I would read to her? She would type as I spoke. I would wait between sentences, but she let me know in no uncertain terms that I didn’t need to wait for her to “catch up”. She was always one step ahead of me.

The other side of that coin are schools who group all “special needs” or cognitively impaired children together, shut up in a classroom by themselves with no interaction with other children, even for lunch. I realize the challenges but there’s something wrong with this. It seems that all it does is foster and reinforce old stereotypes. Both sides lose.

Some years ago I suffered neurological symptoms that affected my speech and mobility. My entire life was flung upside-down in a matter of moments. I was pretty much homebound for sometime afterwards and I will never forget the intense pain of the isolation I felt. But many of these children endure isolation even into adulthood for all their lives.

When friends at my current church asked for help for the Buddy Walk (for Down’s children), I volunteered. They have a son with Down’s and had been involved with organizing the walk for several years. It was very rewarding to be involved with an organization that promotes inclusion of these children and interaction with them. We live in a society that loves and worships what is “normal” (if even that can be defined), a society that often doesn’t have the time or capacity to cope with people on a personal level out of the ordinary “stream” of life.

Your book offers hope by standing strong against stubborn stereotypes. I heartily recommend it to every parent and teacher. It should be in every educator’s library. Thank you, Yvonne, for investing in writing this book. I believe it will be a strong voice for acceptance as more and more people are inspired by it.

Wishing you continued success!

Yours always,

Cindy

Permalink 4 Comments

Review for Dream Catcher, Failure Was Not An Option

November 13, 2009 at 10:15 pm (Biographies, children, family, love, spirituality) (, , , , , , )


dream catcher for poster“This is a true story written by a prolific author, about her own younger brother who suffered Encephalitis when he was not more than a newborn. It entails his strength of personality and will to overcome an illness which left him with a so-called, mental handicap as well as physical.

I was filled with admiration for this man, Stanley Robinson and by the time I finished reading, I was in awe. I would recommend reading to anyone but for those who have known or had a person like Stanley in their lives, it will tug your heartstrings. At the least it is a lesson to the rest of the world…Souls come wrapped up in many different packages..all are a wonderful gift.”

This review was written by Sandy

Permalink Leave a Comment

Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option and Brilliant Insanity are Both on Amazon Kindle’s Best Seller List

September 30, 2009 at 9:42 pm (Biographies, Books by Yvonne Mason, children, Crime Novels, mystery, Self Help, Suspense Novels) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )


Front Cover newEditorial Reviews Product Description Marion Lewis Reinhart, an androgynous serial killer, has five days to live before he is put to death by lethal injection. Due to the severity and mysterious nature of his crimes, he has been given permission to tell the world his side of the story. Not the story told in court, the real story. Reinhart has his own agenda. He believes he was justified in his quest for terrible retribution and he wants to share his truth. His web of lies, twisted facts, and narcissistic story telling hides a truth more shocking than any of his murders. ——————————————————————————– Product Details Format: Kindle Edition File Size: 201 KB Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited Publisher: Kerlak Publishing; 1st,Unabridged edition edition (October 1, 2008) Sold by: Amazon Digital Services Language: English ASIN: B00267SWG4 Average Customer Review: 5 Reviews 5 star: (5) 4 star: (0) 3 star: (0) 2 star: (0) 1 star: (0) › See all 5 customer reviews… 5.0 out of 5 stars See all reviews (5 customer reviews) Amazon.com Sales Rank: #114,672 in Kindle Store (See Bestsellers in Kindle Store) Popular in this category: (What’s this?)

 #23 in Kindle Store > Kindle Books > Fiction > Genre Fiction > Graphic Novels & Manga > Graphic Novels > Mystery Would you like to give feedback on images?

 

 

Dream Catcher new CoverProduct Details

Permalink 2 Comments

Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option – Review By Fran Lewis, Author

September 13, 2009 at 11:36 pm (Books by Yvonne Mason, children, health, Self Help, When Fates Collide, Andrea Dean Van Scoyoc, Tangled Minds, Yvonne Mason, Suspense, Drama, Murder, Serial Killer, Tampa, Key West, Fantasy Fest, Mallory Square, Brilliant Insanity, Dream Catcher Failur) (, , , , , , , , , )


Dream Catcher new Cover for KindleDream Catcher by Yvonne Mason

A story of triumph, love, persistence, endurance and more

There is no such thing as a child who cannot learn. There is no reason why anyone should be shunned or considered an outcast because he or she is challenged academically or in any other way. But, for a child to succeed he or she needs the support, guidance and love of a family. In this story you will meet a remarkable and unique family who not only proved the unimaginable and the unthinkable about a special young man, but engaged the help and love of friends too. Born with a serious illness, Yvonne Mason’s brother Stan proved beyond a shadow of doubt that he was going to show the world that he is here and that he will definitely succeed.

Not able to speak, not able to walk, and not able to do the things that other kids could do at first, he taught himself how to maneuver and crawl when faced with a challenge before the age of one. Born with 2 clubfeet and faced with wearing heavy plaster casts on his feet, Stan, Yvonne’s brother learned to overcome this and managed to move around. But, that is not all, with the help of his brother Barry, sister Yvonne and lots of friends and cousins he managed to learn to walk, take care of his own physical needs, attend school, graduate High School, help play practical jokes with his sister and cousins, take a bus to his Work Training Program and much more. But, what he had to learn after all of this is not much different from what we had to learn: Lessons of Life and Lessons of bigotry and prejudice not only toward people of different color or races but toward people who are different. Stan learned that not everyone is who he or she appears to be. Stan soon learns people can be cruel and underhanded. People take advantage of you when they think you are less knowledgeable than them. This holds for everyone, not just Stan.

His love of bowling, the first time he went to an Atlanta Braves game and his courage to forge ahead against all adversity makes you wonder why young people today give up so fast and try and take the easy way out.

Stan is truly a person to be admired. Nominated for the Toby Nobis award, which recognizes business, and employees who are challenged helped to give him a sense of pride but to his family too. Although he did not win this did not deter him. This was a man who was not supposed to be able “to do the simple things in life. How amazing the brain works,” as the author puts aptly puts it. Where others would whine and complain when Stan was faced with a problem he would handle it head on.

Flying by himself, dealing with a broken television set and adversity at work, he is truly an inspiration for all those who take defeat so easily and readily. Imagine trying to explain to someone the difference between 9-pin bowling and the regular method. As a bowler I do know the difference and when Yvonne describes the incident where Stan was trying to explain why he and his knew friend Lisa changed to a different bowling alley I remembered my brother trying to teach me to bowl without toppling over and throwing my arm cross alley. This story brought back some great memories. But, some lessons are difficult to learn and this time when Lisa proved herself to be a user and conniver his mother stepped in and thwarted Lisa’s scam. Others do not only learn by those who are challenged but these lessons of life too. You can never be too careful when it comes to lending money to a friend, especially when it appears that money is a primary reason for the friendship.

With their Abbot and Costello routines and their many funny high jinks Yvonne, Stan her mother and her family learned that you could do anything if you want to and don’t ever give up.

Everyone looks up to their parents and wants to emulate or follow in their footsteps. Stan loved his father and spending quality time with him and imitating some of his mannerisms and daily routines cemented their bond even more.

You need to read the last chapter written by Yvonne’s mother and presented at West Georgia for everyone to hear. Yvonne’s mother is truly amazing and someone who did what most mother’s should do but might not have the wherewithal or the stamina to do: SHE WOULD NOT ACCEPT FAILURE AS AN OPTION!

Stan is an example of what people must do in order to be happy. He accepted who he is and what his limitations and capabilities are. He would not blame the world for his problems and accepts people for who they are not bigoted or prejudice or hurtful to anyone.

Stan: I have a nephew that was born deaf. No one knew this until he was about a year old. The doctors told his mother and father he would never stand, sit up, walk, and drive a car or more. Then, he entered Lexington School for the Deaf and his mother and father would not let this diagnosis hamper him. He is now the father of a beautiful little girl and a web designer for a major hotel chain and more. Never give up on who you are. Never think that just because a doctor says it that it is written in stone.

Your influence on others will remain in their hearts and mind just by reading your story now and forever. Educators need to follow the example of those who cared enough about Stan and her caring enough to help him learn to read, speak and more. For those educators who teach Special Education you need to remember that kids learn at their own pace and as with Stan they will often surprise you and overcome insurmountable odds. Never give up and never say never. 

You need to read this book and give it to every educator, doctor and parent to know that knowledge if powerful and love and family can help you through anything. Stan’s life is message to all of us that everyone can succeed no matter what if they want to.

This book deserves more than just five stars. Fran Lewis: reviewer

Permalink 1 Comment

California Author Ameerah Alisande Shows Women How to Empower their Lives with “No One is Coming to the Rescue”

September 2, 2009 at 12:17 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , )


no one is coming to the rescue“This book allows us to celebrate, remember, and for some, discover that we were magnificently created. A page turner that will transform the way you see yourself. There is so much power in knowing yourself, loving yourself and taking care of yourself.  It is a must read not just for women but for teens, mothers, sisters, aunts, grandmothers…everybody.”
– Palermo Books
 
 
 
 
 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Ameerah Alisande, author of “No One Is Coming to The Rescue

While pursuing degrees in psychology and business she also enjoyed the exciting world of fashion and modeling. Down deep she always knew that she would someday be able to affect the lives of others in a meaningful manner. Her desire was to be able to be a positive role model for young women; To be able to inspire, mentor and motivate others as she had been mentored by some very powerful women through the years.

After college, she began her teaching career in the public school system as well as the community at large. She took a sabbatical to write a book and entered the world of business. She rejoined her parents in their family’s virtual college bookstore,

Most recently, her strong desire to see change in the world, and to be an instrument of that change, propelled her to begin preparations. She began to accept speaking and teaching engagements where she gives a message of hope, encouragement, self-worth and empowerment through personal development, growth and courage. She has proved to be an excellent communicator. She is currently pursuing a M.A. in Theology. She is also V.P. of content and culture for FreedomMovement.Net, a social network, where she writes the blog, Powerful Women,” through which she continues to impact the lives of girls and women throughout the world.

Ameerah comes to us with a message to “take control of and take responsibility for your own lives, to shape your own futures, to realize your self worth and to become what you were meant to be;

 

AMEERAH-ALISANDE`

No One Is Coming To The Rescue”, hails from the Bay Area of California. She has become a consummate observer of human behavior. Her love of writing began at the age of three. She kept little journals wherein she would scribble pages and pages of indecipherable writing (to the untrained eye that is) and she would read them to her family with great passion and drama. Her creativity was apparent even at that early age. At the age of eleven, her 5th grade teacher, Mr. Abadie took notice of her writing skills. He submitted one of her children’s stories to a Writer’s Guild contest which she won. She had written her first award winning African Folktale. Ameerah was now officially an author. This opportunity also afforded her to serve as background vocals on a children’s album, “Everyone Can Be In the Band”, by Alan Spector. Palermo Books.Com, where she heads a division of the website. She writes a column that spotlights inspirational books and materials. Her entrepreneurial spirit emerged and she launched her own business, which enabled her to impact the lives of many people. She contributed to the book “What To Do With A $1: Kingdom Economics Are More Than Tithes and Offerings” by Maximillion Williams and was featured on the audio version of the book as well. Powerful Women.” For more about the author, or to purchase copies of, ”

NO ONE IS COMING TO THE RESCUE,” VISIT: http://www.AmeerahAlisande.com EMAIL: info@ameerahalisande.net BLOG:http://www.AmeerahAlisande.blogspot.com

Permalink Leave a Comment

Dream Catcher, Failure was Never an Option on the Best Seller List

August 29, 2009 at 8:22 pm (Books by Yvonne Mason) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )


Dream Catcher new Cover for KindleDream Catcher Failure was Never An Option is number 5 on the best seller list for Kindle under siblings. I now have three of my books on the best seller list. Check it out. Dream Catcher is a book to live by.

Permalink 1 Comment

%d bloggers like this: