A Promise Kept; The Story of One Widowed Bride’s Journey through Grief

October 1, 2009 at 11:27 pm (Biographies, Crime Novels, Suspense Novels) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )


A Promise KeptGrief: An Invisible Genre until Now

New heart-rending memoir is about how one woman survives a tragic loss

 

Lynnwood, WA – Those who read Anne Rule’s 1999 book and New York Times bestseller, A Rage To Kill, would know that the first chapter (A Bus To Nowhere) is about the true story of the heroic Seattle Metro Transit driver who was tragically shot and killed in the line of duty on the Aurora Bridge the day after Thanksgiving, 1998, in an unprovoked act of violence, the worse in Metro history.

 But Rule’s recollection of the driver and his family was based solely on hearsay and public knowledge. Now, for the first time, Elise Crawford—the brave man’s widow—in this stirring memoir A Promise Kept courageously allows us a glimpse into how her world was shattered—and how she managed to put the pieces back together.

The life-altering paradox of that fateful day, November 27, 1998, marks the beginning for the driver’s young widow who journals her spiraling descent into hell through a complex system of paths, obstacles—including the tragic death of her mother—and betrayals through which she inevitably becomes lost, essentially missing for nearly eight years in a labyrinthine maze of grief. By no means a poster child for grief, she leans the hard way that grief cannot be outrun, that it has to be faced head on.

 

In A Promise Kept, she reveals her true feelings, raw emotions, and mental anguish she suffered needlessly while making her way down that road less traveled—the journey of grief. Riding every wave, letting the ebb and flow of the tide of grief flow over her, she learns valuable lessons that she never wanted to learn, about the value of life, faith, and self-discovery.  Most importantly, she learns that of all the stages of grief, the most difficult of all is the stage of acceptance, the only one that will show her out of the door of the past and into the present toward healing.

 

Bio :
Elise Crawford was born on a cold and wet November day in the Motor City the year U. S. troops were sent to prevent the South Vietnamese government from collapsing, during election week the year the Voting Rights Act was signed into congress, the year Kellogg’s introduced Pop Tarts, and the year that the first close up photographs of Mars were taken. Elise moved with her mother and younger sister, Jenny, to Seattle in 1968.

        Although not formally educated as a writer, Elise has been writing creative fiction since she was eight years old. Elise holds several Associate of Arts degrees; one in Liberal Arts, two in Social Sciences, and one Technical. Throughout her college education she maintained her membership with the Phi Theta Kappa honor society while raising her two children single-handedly and working on the college campus part-time teaching college level English to fellow ESL students.  

        Elise is a native of Washington; she and Roberto reside in Lynnwood, Washington, with their four cats—Sniffles, Lucky, Foxy, and Fluke. Their CEDAR-AL business continues to flourish and prosper. Elise has two grown children; a son, Dale, and a daughter, Lexi. Her son, Dale, is currently serving in the United States Navy as an aviation ordinance man. His ultimate goal is to become a Navy SEAL. He plans to make the Navy his career. Her daughter, Lexi, lives in southwest Washington, works full-time in a bank, and attends a technical college full-time. Her ultimate goal is to become an architectural engineer.

        A Promise Kept is Elise’s first book; “Spiritual Intervention” was her first short story prior to the writing of this book. She is currently working on Wednesday’s Child, a prequel to A Promise Kept.

 With a sequence of poignant chronological photographs, A Promise Kept not only gives readers “the rest of the story” of that tragic day, but also reaches out to other survivors of tragic loss in hopes they come away with the strength and courage needed to face, to accept, and to begin their own grief journey, regardless of the nature of their loss. If you are searching for a real-life story of love and tragic loss to relate to, and to seek hope and comfort from, then you will want to read A Promise Kept.

 

Links:
www.elisecrawford.com
www.apromisekept.org
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2909507.Elise_Crawford
http://www.authorsden.com/elisercrawford
http://www.more.com/4879/5964-the-impossible-dream
http://theauthorssociety.ning.com/video/a-promise-kept2

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Sardinian Silver by A. Colin Wright

August 10, 2009 at 8:13 pm (Crime Novels, mystery, romance, Suspense Novels) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )


S.SilverBOOK ORDERS, contact                                                                                                                                                                                               ITALIAN CULTURE                    

www.iUniverse.com   or http://www.amazon.ca                                                                                                                       

Tel: 1-800-AUTHORS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Finding One’s Self on a Romantic Island That Time Forgot

Sardinian Silver

 

KINGSTON, ONTARIO – How many young people have dreamt of self and sexual discovery in a far off, exotic place? Arthur Fraser, the main character of Sardinian Silver (published by iUniverse) by A. Colin Wright, not only dreamt of it, he realized his dream. Recruited to represent a travel firm from his homeland of Great Britain, Arthur arrives in the resort town of Alghero on the Island of Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea and is instantly bewitched. Based on his own time on Sardinia, Wright’s captivating and oftentimes hilarious novel follows the exploits of a young man trying to find love while assimilating to an archaically orthodox society.

 

Sardinian Silver opens with Arthur sailing across the Tyrrhenian Sea towards his new home. On his journey to Sardinia, Arthur meets a native Sardinian named Gavino. Eager to make a new friend, let alone a British one, Gavino strikes up a conversation with Arthur and quickly offers to show Arthur his island. Gavino is the first in a cavalcade of characters, serious, humorous and tragic, that help make Sardinian Silver the engaging recollection that it is.

 

Once settled into the Sardinian resort at which he is working, Arthur sets out on achieving the one thing he wants most; finding a Sardinian girlfriend. He knows that this will not be easy, as Gavino has already warned him. Sardinia in the 1960s was still very culturally undeveloped. Sardinia’s residents viewed mainland Italians and continentals (the British counted among them) as immoral and contaminated by modern society. Still, this does not dissuade Arthur from his task.

 

It was ten past nine. Quickly the girls had gone.

Parties like this were so promising, yet so empty. I recall another one, with Gavino and some of Marcella’s friends, where one girl enjoyed a few hidden caresses while we clutched together publicly, but reacted scornfully when I attempted to get her outside alone, and the others were quite shocked. Except for Marcella, who made fun of me. Hug and hold tightly in a dance, but be satisfied with this brief, despairing feel of another body, for it’s all you’re going to get unless you pay a prostitute for more: southern Italy in a nutshell. Yet Sardinia was a land of promise, which I loved even if it remained unfulfilled.

 

In the tradition of Brideshead Revisited and The Lost Girl, Sardinian Silver is a charming and witty novel of growth, loss and realization that is sure to delight even the most critical reader.

 

A. Colin Wright was born and raised in the county of Essex, England. After serving as a linguist in the British Royal Air Force, Wright attended Cambridge University where he earned undergraduate and graduate degrees. In 1964, he was appointed a professor of Russian at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He remained at Queen’s until his retirement in 1999 and still resides there today. Dr. Wright is married and has two grown sons. See also www.sardiniansilver.com and www.acolinwright.ca

 

Available from www.iuniverse.com                ISBN Hardcover 978-0-595-71601-2 Also at http://www.amazon.ca                                                                    Paper        978-0-595-48100-2

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